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Accessible Content - General Samples

Examples

Example 1

A line chart showing crystallite sizes on the y-axis increasing as pH value increases on the x-axis, peaking at forty-five nanometers in size at ten point zero pH.
Caption

Influence of the pH value of the source solution on crystallite sizes.

Alt Text

A line chart showing crystallite sizes on the y-axis increasing as pH value increases on the x-axis, peaking at forty-five nanometers in size at ten point zero pH.

Long Description

A line chart showing how pH value affects the source solution on crystallite sizes. The x-axis shows increasing pH value from 7.0 to 10.5, increasing in units of 0.5. The y-axis shows Crystallite size in nanometers, from 0 to 60, increasing in units of 10. The line chart is steady between pH levels 7.0 to 9.0, with Crystallite size at an average of 12 nanometers. The chart shows a sharp increase between pH levels 9.0 and 10.5, spiking to 45 nanometers.

Example 2

An open cycle of tissue planted in dish with a nutrient medium, leading to growth which fills the dish, leading to cell dissociation allowing replating to larger surface area dish, starting the cycle over.
Caption

Anchorage dependency and contact inhibition in cultured normal diploid cells.

Alt Text

An open cycle of tissue planted in dish with a nutrient medium, leading to growth which fills the dish, leading to cell dissociation allowing replating to larger surface area dish, starting the cycle over.

Long Description

An open cycle of tissue growth which feeds back on itself. Step one starts with tissue dissociation at the top. Step two adds tissue to a dish filled with a nutrient medium, growth of new cells leads to step three where the dish fills its surface area with tissue. Cell dissociation leads to step 4 and the cell sample is replated on a larger surface area medium leading back to step two.

Example 3

Two, three-column abacus, showing the numbers one hundred twenty-three and five hundred seven.
Caption

The decimal numbers 123 (left) and 507 (right), expressed by a base-5 abacus. The four lower stones represent units 0–4, and the upper stones represent chunks of 5. Lower stones are moved up to process units; and sliding an upper stone down means processing chunks of 5 units each. The number 7 is represented by one 5 and two 1’s, e.g., (5 + 2).

Alt Text

Two, three-column abacus, showing the numbers one hundred twenty-three and five hundred seven.

Example 4

Caption

Lockheed U-2 Dragon Lady reconnaissance aircraft with a turbojet engine. This image is considered decorative.

Example 5

Six feedback loops divided evenly between two groups. Group (a) Two Links in a Loop, has two positive loops and one negative loop created by elements A and B. Group (b) Three Links in a Loop, has two negative loops and one positive loop created by elements A, B, and C.
Caption

Combinations of different links in feedback.

Alt Text

Six feedback loops divided evenly between two groups. Group (a) Two Links in a Loop, has two positive loops and one negative loop created by elements A and B. Group (b) Three Links in a Loop, has two negative loops and one positive loop created by elements A, B, and C.

Long Description

Group (a) two links in a group has three examples. Example A1 is the left diagram and has A orbiting clockwise as a positive value to B which orbits clockwise as a positive value back to A, creating a positive loop. Example A2 is the center diagram and has A orbiting clockwise as a positive value to B which orbits clockwise as a negative value back to A, creating a negative loop. Example A3 is the right diagram and has A orbiting clockwise as a negative value to B which orbits clockwise as a negative value back to A, creating a positive loop. Group (b) three links in a group has three examples. Example B1 is the left diagram and has A orbiting clockwise as a positive value to B which orbits clockwise as a negative value to C which orbits clockwise as a positive value back to A, creating a negative loop. Example B2 is the center diagram and has A orbiting clockwise as a negative value to B which orbits clockwise as a negative value to C which orbits clockwise as a positive value back to A, creating a positive loop. Example B3 is the right diagram and has A orbiting clockwise as a negative value to B which orbits clockwise as a negative value to C which orbits clockwise as a negative value back to A, creating a negative loop.

Example 6

A four panel window showing the relationship axis of self-forming columns and others forming rows. Top left panel represents “Open” and is Known to Self and Known to Others. Bottom left panel is “Closed” Known to Self but Not Known to Others. Top right panel is “Blind” Not Known to Self but Known to Others. Finally bottom right panel is “unknown” Not Known to Self and Not Known to Others.
Caption

The Johari Window of intercultural communication Source: Author

Alt Text

A four panel window showing the relationship axis of self-forming columns and others forming rows. Top left panel represents “Open” and is Known to Self and Known to Others. Bottom left panel is “Closed” Known to Self but Not Known to Others. Top right panel is “Blind” Not Known to Self but Known to Others. Finally bottom right panel is “unknown” Not Known to Self and Not Known to Others.

Example 7

Configuration diagram of a four element transmit array in the bottom far left sends a beam to a target in the top far right which reflects down to a four element receive array in the far bottom right. All elements are annotated with angular and distance equations.
Caption

Transmitting and receiving ULAs for bistatic radar.

Alt Text

Configuration diagram of a four element transmit array in the bottom far left sends a beam to a target in the top far right which reflects down to a four element receive array in the far bottom right. All elements are annotated with angular and distance equations.

Long Description

Configuration diagram of a transmit array in the bottom left, a receive array in the bottom right, and a target in the top right. The transmit array shows four antenna but may consist of more as annotated by N sub T for antenna numbers, each antenna separated by d sub T distance. The base transmit angle, theta sub T, is directly above the transmit array. The receive array shows four antenna but may consist of more as annotated by N sub R for antenna numbers, each antenna separated by d sub R distance. The base receive angle, theta sub R, is directly above the receive array. The transmit array and receive array center points are separated by D distance. The target is traveling in level flight on angle nu sub t. The transmit array beam is represented as a line leading to the target with angle delta over a distance of R sub T. The returned signal is a ling leading to the receive array with angle beta sub 0 from the target over a distance of R sub R.

Example 8

Two part image of plot points. Part (a) shows two distinct groups separated by a linear boundary line going from bottom left to top right. Part (b) shows intermixed points which, when viewed at a higher level forms a non-linear circular boundary with one group surrounded by components of the other.
Caption

(a) Linear boundary with classifier hyperplane and (b) nonlinear boundary with classifier hyperplane.

Alt Text

Two part image of plot points. Part (a) shows two distinct groups separated by a linear boundary line going from bottom left to top right. Part (b) shows intermixed points which, when viewed at a higher level forms a non-linear circular boundary with one group surrounded by components of the other.

Long Description

Part (a) has two distinct groups separated by a linear boundary line going from bottom left to top right. The first group on the left is made of eight circles in two ragged ranks of four running parallel to the boundary. The second group is made of exes and is opposite the first, it consists of two ranks with four in the front rank and three in the second rank running parallel to the line. Part (b) shows the non-linear boundary with intermixed points and multiple linear boundary lines which define no distinct groups themselves. Evaluating the plots at a higher level shows a circular non-linear boundary containing eight circles and the boundary is surrounded by ten exes, placed almost equidistance around the perimeter, though at different z-axis heights.