Philosophers on Film

'The true significance of film for philosophy, and of philosophy for film, cannot be established in abstract or general terms. It can only be measured in and through individual philosophers' attempts to account for their experience of specific films. This series promises to provide a productive context for that indispensable enterprise.'Stephen Mulhall, Fellow and Reader in Philosophy, New College, Oxford

Film is increasingly used to introduce and discuss key topics and problems in philosophy, whilst some films raise important philosophical questions of their own. Yet until now, dependable resources for those studying and teaching philosophy and film have been limited. Philosophers on Film answers this growing need and is the first series of its kind. Each volume assembles a team of international contributors who explore a single film in depth. Beginning with an introduction by the editor, each specially-commissioned chapter discusses a key aspect of the film in question.

Additional features include a biography of the director and suggestions for further reading, making the series ideal for anyone studying philosophy, film and anyone with a general interest in the philosophical dimensions of cinema.

  • Blade Runner

    Edited by Amy Coplan, David Davies

    Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner is widely regarded as a "masterpiece of modern cinema" and is regularly ranked as one of the great films of all time. Set in a dystopian future where the line between human beings and ‘replicants’ is blurred, the film raises a host of philosophical questions about what…

    Paperback – 2015-04-14
    Routledge
    Philosophers on Film

  • Mulholland Drive

    Edited by Zina Giannopoulou

    Beloved by film and art aficionados and fans of neo-noir cinema, Mulholland Drive is one of the most important and enigmatic films of recent years. It occupies a central and controversial position in the work of its director, David Lynch, who won the best director award at the 2001 Cannes Film…

    Paperback – 2013-08-30
    Routledge
    Philosophers on Film

  • Vertigo

    Edited by Katalin Makkai

    Released in 1958, Vertigo is widely regarded as Alfred Hitchcock’s masterpiece and one of the greatest films of all time. This is the first book devoted to exploring the philosophical aspects of Vertigo. Following an introduction by the editor that places the film in context, each chapter reflects…

    Paperback – 2012-12-06
    Routledge
    Philosophers on Film

  • Fight Club

    Edited by Thomas E. Wartenberg

    Released in 1999, Fight Club is David Fincher’s popular adaption of Chuck Palahniuk’s cult novel, and one of the most philosophically rich films of recent years. This is the first book to explore the varied philosophical aspects of the film. Beginning with an introduction by the editor that places…

    Paperback – 2011-09-16
    Routledge
    Philosophers on Film

  • Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind

    Edited by Christopher Grau

    Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind is one of the most widely discussed and thought-provoking films of recent years. This is the first book to explore and address the philosophical aspects of Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind. Beginning with a helpful introduction that places each essay in…

    Paperback – 2009-05-26
    Routledge
    Philosophers on Film

  • Memento

    Edited by Andrew Kania

    Within a short space of time, the film Memento has already been hailed as a modern classic. Memorably narrated in reverse, from the perspective of Leonard Shelby, the film’s central character, it follows Leonard’s chaotic and visceral quest to discover the identity of his wife’s killer and avenge…

    Paperback – 2009-05-18
    Routledge
    Philosophers on Film

  • Talk to Her

    Edited by A. W. Eaton

    Pedro Almodóvar is one of the most renowned film directors of recent years. Talk to Her is one of the most discussed and controversial of all his films. Dealing principally with the issue of rape, it also offers profound insights into the nature of love and friendship whilst raising important…

    Paperback – 2008-07-31
    Routledge
    Philosophers on Film

  • The Thin Red Line

    Edited by David Davies

    The Thin Red Line is the third feature-length film from acclaimed director Terrence Malick, set during the struggle between American and Japanese forces for Guadalcanal in the South Pacific during World War Two. It is a powerful, enigmatic and complex film that raises important philosophical…

    Paperback – 2008-07-31
    Routledge
    Philosophers on Film